2017 Dumbo Open Studios

I’m happy to be participating in this year’s revival of the annual Dumbo Open Studios.

The event will be held on May 13 and 14th this year, a big change from the fall dates used in past years. The event website lists over 100 artists and at least eight of those are right here in the same building as my own space. Come see what the studio is like in the spring!

DUMBO Open Studios
Saturday, May 13 + Sunday, May 14
1-6 PM.
89 Bridge Street, 2nd Floor Left
Brooklyn NY 11201
Google map

My listing on the event website

Dumbo open studios, May 13 + 14, 2017, 1-6PM, dumboopenstudios.com

Sacred and Spiritual: A Visit with Artist Randy Stoltzfus

This account of a visit to the studio written by Linda Clarke appeared in a monthly newsletter published by the Brooklyn Monthly Meeting in October of 2016.

Lucy Sikes and I visited the Studio of Randall Stoltzfus one hot and humid afternoon in August. We are the perfect pair for this as Lucy is a professional artist with a career spanning more than fifty years and I am, um, intuitive. (Lucy kindly refers to this as “the poetic view.”) Together we embody both ends of the spectrum of viewer sophistication.

Randy Stoltzfus stands with one of his paintings in his Brooklyn studio For the few who haven’t met him, Randy is the spouse of Friend Callie Janoff and is a frequent attender at Brooklyn Monthly Meeting. Having seen some of his artwork on his website, I knew that it was highly creative and skillful. And very original! I also had seen some of his paintings in reality, and was impressed with the way the light and the physical depth of the work spoke to my feelings. Nonetheless, I found myself ill-prepared for the visual cornucopia we encountered in his studio. The two dimensional view on the website (www.sloweye.net) conveys quite a bit about the quality and creativity but, naturally, fails to deliver the effect that accompanies the depth and light of the originals. In addition to the abundance of human feelings raised by his works (such as tenderness, playfulness, joy and serenity), there exists a richness of quality I think of as pertaining to the sacred (or, in a word, spiritual). The light presented in some paintings vaguely recalled in me some mostly forgotten place, while evoking memories of a rare silence.

"Sidereal" by Randall Stoltzfus. 2014, Acrylic dispersion with gold leaf on recycled polymer, 48 by 60 inches.The two artists talked about skills and technique and I was very interested to learn about some of them. It takes a lot of layers to create the complexity of Stoltzfus’ work and this translates into a lot of time and effort. One painting of a night sky, which is unique for its faithful depiction of the actual light of the stars, was accomplished via the incorporation of gold leaf. (There was some other talk about the use of red pigment which I couldn’t follow because I was still employed in walking back and forth to test the effect at different distances.) And though they may have explained some things to me about another work in shades of black and silver, I don’t expect to ever understand how it was able to evoke feelings of tenderness.

Stoltzfus embodies his awe and wonder of our universe in his work and invites us to explore visual experiences in a completely new way. I would not be surprised to see him recognized as a paradigm changer among artists characterized as sacred or spiritual painters.

— Linda Clarke, Brooklyn Meeting News

painting titled 'PArapet' by Randall Stoltzfus

Delightfully Challenging

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The rich blue and gold of Stoltzfus’ large, painted abstractions draw viewers into the gallery. These glimmering works — some actually made with gold and palladium leaf — represent the modernist tradition. Indeed, like Kandinsky and Rothko before him, Stoltzfus seeks to represent through form and color the immaterial essence of pure spirit. In “Scarab,” he depicts a subtle luminosity emerging  from a dense network of blacks. In “After,” the glow is more assertive, and suggests the final blast of a fireworks display, its image reflected out across the surface of a dark lake. Each composition is built through a laborious process of painting one circle after another until the entire surface of the canvas has been encrusted with the repeated pattern. Some may find Stoltzfus’ repetition of a single form cold or mechanical, perhaps at odds with the artist’s larger goal; others may liken its repetitive logic to chanting or prayer.

— Patricia Briggs, The Chautauquan Daily

Spectrum

July 26 – October 29, 2016

Reception: Saturday, July 30, 5-8 p.m.

Laura Korman Gallery
Bergamot Station Arts Center
2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite D-2
Santa Monica, CA 90404
info@laurakormangallery.com
(310) 828-1883
Map

Spectrum show Invite, Laura Korman Gallery

From the Press Release:

Laura Korman Gallery is pleased to exhibit artists Cara Barer, Heather Carisch, James Lecce, Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Maureen McQuillan, Kristina Quinones, and Randall Stoltzfus in the group exhibition, SPECTRUM…

SPECTRUM brings together seven artists from across the country with vastly different practices, who are united by their intrepid handling of color as an evocative agent of expression.

and

Oscillating between abstraction and representation, Randall Stoltzfus uses the circle as a basis for his practice. Conjuring up visions of Seurat’s neo-Impressionist Pointillist paintings and Van Gogh’s Starry Night, Stoltzfus intricately builds layers of multicolored circular patterns with oil, adding carefully selected pigments and gold leaf to produce images that seem to glow from within. These abstract landscapes at once reference the macro and the micro, as Stoltzfus breaks up the picture plane into a myriad of mesmerizing forms that taken from afar form a single cohesive image.