2017 Dumbo Open Studios

I’m happy to be participating in this year’s revival of the annual Dumbo Open Studios.

The event will be held on May 13 and 14th this year, a big change from the fall dates used in past years. The event website lists over 100 artists and at least eight of those are right here in the same building as my own space. Come see what the studio is like in the spring!

DUMBO Open Studios
Saturday, May 13 + Sunday, May 14
1-6 PM.
89 Bridge Street, 2nd Floor Left
Brooklyn NY 11201
Google map

My listing on the event website

Dumbo open studios, May 13 + 14, 2017, 1-6PM, dumboopenstudios.com

Scott Bodenner on Recycled Synthetic Canvas

Scott Bodenner is a gifted textile designer, polymath, and friend. He trained as a hand weaver, with a degree from RISD and early on-the-job experience with a German textile mill. He has a unique perspective on industrial mill capabilities and limitations, to which he brings a deeply held concern for recycling. One of his favorite books is Victor Papanek’s Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change .

I am lucky to have had the chance to work with Scott to produce a custom bolt of synthetic artist’s canvas using recycled polymer. I recently sat down with Scott to talk about that project and ask the questions that a painter might have for a textile savant.

Continue reading about manufacturing recycled synthetic artist canvas…


Continue reading “Scott Bodenner on Recycled Synthetic Canvas”

Delightfully Challenging

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The rich blue and gold of Stoltzfus’ large, painted abstractions draw viewers into the gallery. These glimmering works — some actually made with gold and palladium leaf — represent the modernist tradition. Indeed, like Kandinsky and Rothko before him, Stoltzfus seeks to represent through form and color the immaterial essence of pure spirit. In “Scarab,” he depicts a subtle luminosity emerging  from a dense network of blacks. In “After,” the glow is more assertive, and suggests the final blast of a fireworks display, its image reflected out across the surface of a dark lake. Each composition is built through a laborious process of painting one circle after another until the entire surface of the canvas has been encrusted with the repeated pattern. Some may find Stoltzfus’ repetition of a single form cold or mechanical, perhaps at odds with the artist’s larger goal; others may liken its repetitive logic to chanting or prayer.

— Patricia Briggs, The Chautauquan Daily