20th Annual Postcards from the Edge

I made a special miniature, reversed and adapted version of my new “Lost Rainbow” print just so I could send it into this year’s edition of Postcards from the Edge. Which means that someone with sharp eyes will take it home for $85 and support a good cause to boot. But even if the little rainbow I made stays lost, they’ll wind up with something fantastic; there’s a lot of beautiful stuff in this fundraiser.

POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE

Hosted by Visual AIDS at Gallery 524

January 19-21, 2018

Over 1,400 original postcard-sized artworks!

Visual Aids LogoPostcards From the Edge offers a rare opportunity to acquire original, postcard-sized artwork from internationally renowned and emerging artists for only $85 each. Offered on a first-come, first-served basis, over 1400 works are exhibited anonymously, and the identity of the artist is revealed only after the work is purchased. With the playing field leveled, all participants can take home a piece by a famous artist, or one who’s just making their debut in the art world. Nonetheless, collectors walk away with something beautiful, a piece of art they love!

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Silent Auction to Benefit the New York Women’s Foundation

Light on the Water | Quay (Study), a drawing in pastel and raw pigment by Randall Stoltzfus
“Quay (Study)” Pastel and raw pigment on paper, 7 x 11 inches.

I’ve donated this drawing to a benefit holiday party happening December 14th, 2017 from 6-9 PM at Blank Space Gallery + Lie Sang Bong at 30 Gansevoort Street in New York.

You are invited to attend the party if that is possible for you. Just RSVP to the gallery.

If you are interested participating in the auction but cannot attend, just contact the gallery to request a bid form.

Also participating in the benefit auction are gallery artists Antoinette Wysocki, Arno Elias, Elyce Abrams, Farsad Labbauf, Heejo Kim, J.T. Kirkland, Jonny Detgier, Matthew Langley, and Suzy Taekyung Kim. Contact the gallery for a complete list of artwork in the auction.

All proceeds from the auction will benefit the New York Women’s Foundation to help under-resourced New York communities make a difference.

2017 Dumbo Open Studios

I’m happy to be participating in this year’s revival of the annual Dumbo Open Studios.

The event will be held on May 13 and 14th this year, a big change from the fall dates used in past years. The event website lists over 100 artists and at least eight of those are right here in the same building as my own space. Come see what the studio is like in the spring!

DUMBO Open Studios
Saturday, May 13 + Sunday, May 14
1-6 PM.
89 Bridge Street, 2nd Floor Left
Brooklyn NY 11201
Google map

My listing on the event website

Dumbo open studios, May 13 + 14, 2017, 1-6PM, dumboopenstudios.com

Sacred and Spiritual: A Visit with Artist Randy Stoltzfus

This account of a visit to the studio written by Linda Clarke appeared in a monthly newsletter published by the Brooklyn Monthly Meeting in October of 2016.

Lucy Sikes and I visited the Studio of Randall Stoltzfus one hot and humid afternoon in August. We are the perfect pair for this as Lucy is a professional artist with a career spanning more than fifty years and I am, um, intuitive. (Lucy kindly refers to this as “the poetic view.”) Together we embody both ends of the spectrum of viewer sophistication.

Randy Stoltzfus stands with one of his paintings in his Brooklyn studio For the few who haven’t met him, Randy is the spouse of Friend Callie Janoff and is a frequent attender at Brooklyn Monthly Meeting. Having seen some of his artwork on his website, I knew that it was highly creative and skillful. And very original! I also had seen some of his paintings in reality, and was impressed with the way the light and the physical depth of the work spoke to my feelings. Nonetheless, I found myself ill-prepared for the visual cornucopia we encountered in his studio. The two dimensional view on the website (www.sloweye.net) conveys quite a bit about the quality and creativity but, naturally, fails to deliver the effect that accompanies the depth and light of the originals. In addition to the abundance of human feelings raised by his works (such as tenderness, playfulness, joy and serenity), there exists a richness of quality I think of as pertaining to the sacred (or, in a word, spiritual). The light presented in some paintings vaguely recalled in me some mostly forgotten place, while evoking memories of a rare silence.

The light presented in some paintings vaguely recalled in me some mostly forgotten place, while evoking memories of a rare silence | "Sidereal" by Randall Stoltzfus. 2014, Acrylic dispersion with gold leaf on recycled polymer, 48 by 60 inches.
“Sidereal” by Randall Stoltzfus. 2014, Acrylic dispersion with gold leaf on recycled polymer, 48 by 60 inches.

The two artists talked about skills and technique and I was very interested to learn about some of them. It takes a lot of layers to create the complexity of Stoltzfus’ work and this translates into a lot of time and effort. One painting of a night sky, which is unique for its faithful depiction of the actual light of the stars, was accomplished via the incorporation of gold leaf. (There was some other talk about the use of red pigment which I couldn’t follow because I was still employed in walking back and forth to test the effect at different distances.) And though they may have explained some things to me about another work in shades of black and silver, I don’t expect to ever understand how it was able to evoke feelings of tenderness.

Stoltzfus embodies his awe and wonder of our universe in his work and invites us to explore visual experiences in a completely new way. I would not be surprised to see him recognized as a paradigm changer among artists characterized as sacred or spiritual painters.

— Linda Clarke, Brooklyn Meeting News

I don't expect to ever understand how it was able to evoke feelings of tenderness | 'Parapet' by Randall Stoltzfus
“Parapet” by Randall Stoltzfus. Acrylic dispersion on polymer canvas, 32 x 40 inches.