Omega Skylight Time Lapse

After working on Omega for three years, I got pretty familiar with seeing the painting in my skylit Brooklyn studio. So when the time to ship the painting out for it’s first showing came, I felt a little anxiety about how it would read in a different space, with different lighting, and to different eyes.

This wasn’t the first time I’ve felt this way. One of the things that helps me quiet this feeling of uncertainty is good documentation. Usually this means taking the best photos I can afford of the artwork. But photographing Omega was challenging, both because of it’s size, and because of how much some very subtle changes in near black tones contribute to the drawing and meaning of the image. On top of that, every documentation photograph is a compromise on the way a painting is experienced in real life. Especially when seen under living, breathing natural light.

As an experiment, I decided to try video to document this painting.

Of my several attempts, this time lapse recording of the painting hanging in the studio on a October day comes closest to communicating how I felt about seeing the painting there. The flickering light in the video comes from fall clouds passing overhead. Seeing the video is obviously still not the same as visiting the painting in real life. But for me it is a nice reminder of what having the painting in the studio was like.

One Blue Circle at a Time

I’ve been working on this color saturated larger painting for a few months. The scale makes the mood-lifting color bath that much better. It’s some real studio color therapy.

Here’s a one minute video of me painting one blue circle in just the right spot.

Sightline Time-lapse Animation

Five months of hand-painted circles on the eight foot canvas “Sightline” are compressed into these two minutes of time-lapse animation. ¬†Even though the resulting video looks like speed-painting, what’s going on in the studio is pretty carefully considered!

I made this video as a diy instant-replay for myself, hoping to learn something that will make me a better painter. The resulting clip is fascinating for several dramatic changes to the painting and the many layers of paint it reveals.

Here is a link to Photographs of the finished piece installed and more about the painting.

Music is a Library of Congress field recording:
Title: Devil’s dream
Contributor Names:
Mann, Thomas (performing on hammered dulcimer)
Cowell, Sidney Robertson (collector)
Archive of Folk Culture (Library of Congress)
Created / Published: 1937.